By

Tony Bloom and His Wife’s Battle With Multiple Sclerosis

linda bloomTony Bloom is a trustee and co-founder of the Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis (OMS) Foundation initially set up by his Australian born wife Linda in 2011. The two have been working with various other professionals, individuals and organizations to help raise awareness about the condition and to help those affected by it.

Linda Bloom was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in 2002 when she was only 28 years old and halfway through her psychology masters course. She was in such an awful state that she could neither lift a pen nor get up from her seat. With the help of her sister, she discovered the work of Professor Jelinek which helped her manage her condition and nurse herself back to health.

As Linda Bloom herself stated in an interview: “Professor Jelinek’s work involves a self-help program providing tools to help people with MS take control of their own lives, to manage symptoms and empower themselves to heal. It’s based on the pioneering work of Professor Roy Swank, who started a very long-term research project in 1949, and so builds on over 40 years of research. It involves a plant-based, whole-food diet plus seafood, with very little saturated fat and supplemented by omega-3 oils, especially flaxseed oil – our results showed that flaxseed oil contributed to a 60% reduction in MS relapse rates. The program further recommends vitamin D3 supplementation depending on the availability of sunlight, stress management, exercise and meditation as required.”

The charity spreads information and awareness of such as well as helps patients make better informed decisions and choices for themselves and their condition.

Characterized by relapses with varying types, frequencies and degrees of symptoms, Multiple Sclerosis only affects 0.0357% of the entire population making it one of the rarest conditions in the medical field. Based on statistics, those diagnosed are often between the ages of 20 and 40 with more women than men and are more prevalent in colder regions.

The degenerative neurological disease affects the nervous system and disrupts the flow of information within the brain and between it and the body. Common symptoms include but are not limited to dizziness, fatigue, vision problems, balance issues, bladder problems, muscle stiffness, spasms, memory incapacity, speech difficulty, emotional instability, and numbness among others.

In a bid to raise awareness and funds for the cause, Tony Bloom ran the Brighton marathon twice, first during its inaugural run in 2011 and another one in 2015.

By

Facts About Tony Bloom That’ll Make Your Jaw Drop

tony bloomBusinessman-investor Tony Bloom has made quite a name of his own. One of the more prominent figures in the United Kingdom’s business scene, he’s quite the man of a few words but of many hats. You’d be surprised as to the many roles he juggles and the accomplishments he has made so far.

Need a little more convincing? Here’s a list of facts about Tony Bloom that’ll make your jaw drop.

“He managed to grab a position at Big Four member accounting firm Earnest & Young, a feat for professionals then and now, only to leave it a few years later.”

With a degree in mathematics and a promising finish from the University of Manchester, Tony Bloom had quite a bright future ahead of him. It wasn’t a huge surprise to many that he managed to grab the position as options trader at Earnest & Young after his graduation but what shocked more people was that he left it shortly afterwards to try his hand on entrepreneurship and investments. It was quite the risk especially during the ‘90s but one worth the hazard as Tony managed to build a solid equity from it. Of course, that came with a lot of hard work but isn’t success always a product of grit anyway?

“He gave the Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club its own home base after having to live without one for twelve long years.”

In 1997, Bill Archer and David Belloti sold the Goldstone Ground in a feeble attempt to pay off debts which only ended up with a massive protest from the board and fans alike as the sale had little if any profit from the transaction. This also left the club without its own home base so it had to share and rent stadiums away from Brighton for the next twelve years. This changed when Tony Bloom became its chairman in May of 2009. He spearheaded and helped personally finance the £93 million 30,750 capacity American Express Community Stadium and even had a special facility built for good measure called the American Express Elite Football Centre.

“He’s also a successful philanthropist on top of it all.”

As if being a businessman-investor and football club chairman were not enough, Tony Bloom also delved into various philanthropic works. In 2011, he founded the Bloom Foundation with its advocacies on poverty and then later on co-founded the Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis Foundation with his wife Linda.

 

By

A Thing or Two About Tony Bloom’s Advocacies and Foundations

Tony-bloom-overcoming-msBusinessman-investor and football club chairman Tony Bloom has more up his sleeves. As if they weren’t already full, he adds philanthropist to the list. And we’re not talking about just one charity but two.

In 2011, he set up the Tony Bloom Charitable Trust together with fellow trustees Linda Bloom, Adam Franks, Marc Sugarman and Marcelle Lester. It’s charitable objects reads as follows:

“The prevention or relief of poverty in developing countries by providing or assisting in the provision of education, training, healthcare projects and all the necessary support designed to enable individuals to generate a sustainable income and be self-sufficient. To promote and protect the physical and mental health of disabled and terminally ill children and soldiers disabled or made ill by conflict. Such charitable purposes for the public benefit as are exclusively charitable under the laws of England and Wales as the trustees may from time to time determine.”

The foundation has since offered and made grants to various causes, projects, activities, organizations and efforts that are geared towards poverty. It supports efforts made towards disability, economic and community development, employment, training and education, overseas aid, famine relief, health advancement, health improvement, life saving efforts, prevention or relief of poverty, general and other charitable purposes. Soon after, it was renamed to simply the Bloom Foundation. It currently holds office at London and targets several areas all over the United Kingdom, the rest of Europe and the developing nations in Africa and Asia.

With his wife Linda who is the main founder of the OMS (Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis) Foundation, Tony’s advocacies also include spreading awareness about the condition and helping patients suffering from it. He even ran the Brighton marathon twice to raise both funds and awareness for the said charity.

The OMS Foundation was a result of the couple’s personal battle with the condition. Around more than a decade ago, Linda was diagnosed with MS where she was left almost paralyzed.

The debilitating disease is a rare one that affects only 0.035% of the world population. It is a degenerative neurological disease that affects the central nervous system and disrupts the flow of information within the brain and between it and the body causing symptoms such as dizziness, fatigue, vision problems, difficulty in balance, bladder issues, muscle stiffness, spasms, memory incapacity, speaking problems and emotional instability among others.

Tony Bloom sure has a big heart and these sure are enough to prove it.

By

What Football Does for Your Body

strong musclesThey say that sports are good for you and we completely agree. This is why today we decided to shine the spotlight on the world’s favorite, football, and dissect how it impacts the body in its most physical sense.

There’s a reason why football is said to build cardiovascular or heart health. A single player runs an average of five to seven miles per game with others even reaching 9.5 miles. Running is the most common and effective form of cardio. It stabilizes heart rate, improves blood circulation, resists plaque buildup in the coronary arteries and burns a lot of calories. Apart from running, there’s a lot of walking, jogging and jumping too.

It burns fat and bad cholesterol. There’s a lot of exercise that happens in this sport. Overtime, players develop great aerobic capacity as they are able to switch from walking to sprinting to recovering and back at it again with ease and in repetition. All that helps burn a lot of body fat and in a natural way too. The need to go from aerobic to anaerobic movements even does this faster than any other sport.

It strengthens the bones. Playing the sport helps increase bone density. The built up mechanical load during training and playtime accelerates the process of deposition thereby encouraging the body to build and develop a stronger skeletal frame.

Get strong and toned muscles. Many people get muscles but not everyone develops them strong. This is why many nutritionists note of “fake muscles”. They look tones and lean but they’re not strong. They’re merely just for show. We don’t want that. By playing football, the body gets both: strength and toned muscles. And when we mean strength it’s the overall because the sport requires all areas of the body to move, hold, kick and stop the ball across a huge field of opponents.

It develops flexibility. Because players have to shift from aerobic to anaerobic energy pathways and moving fast to halting to sprinting and all that, flexibility is developed. This helps the body avoid and resist injury when it comes to physical activity and even unexpected situations.

Football helps increase immune function. Playing the sport even for fun requires a lot of physical and mental activity. By subjecting the body to these small and tolerable amounts of stress on repeat teaches it to be stronger. In a way, it helps make it immune to getting easily sick or tired.

By

An Inside Look at the Albion Chairman: Tony Bloom

albion and hoveThe current Brighton and Hove Albion chairman has become one of the most celebrated to date and for obvious reasons. As a matter of fact, Tony Bloom has been awarded as Brighton’s most outstanding citizen for his many contributions to both the club and the sport.

It was in May of 2009 when Tony succeeded Harry Dick Knight into the chairmanship but his hands on engagement have begun as early as the year 2000 when he first entered the club as a major investor and stockholder.

He led and helped personally finance the construction of the American Express Community Stadium in 2008. The former Falmer’s Stadium was renovated to now hold up to a maximum of 30,750 people. This £93 million project finished in 2011 and ended the 12 long years of the club without a home base after it lost Goldstone Ground in 1997 and then had to rent out stadiums miles away from Brighton.

Tony also spearheaded the construction of the fully equipped American Express Elite Football Performance Centre, a project dedicated to provide a complete and up to date facility for athletes, both aspirants and professionals alike.

But you’d be surprised to know that his fondness for the football and the Brighton and Hove Albion F. C. began as early as his childhood years. His family was a huge fan of both so he grew up watching matches at the Goldstone Ground with his relatives and growing a fondness for the two as well. In fact, he’s the 3rd generation of the Blooms in 40 years to hold a seat in the club. His grandfather Harry was deputy chair in the ’70s while his uncle Ray was a director in the ’80s.

Before his football association, Tony Bloom was first an investor and businessman. He has built his equity successfully after taking risks and leaving a stable job as an options trader at accounting firm Earnest & Young. It was a massive risk but one worth the trouble.

But apart from being a successful businessman, investor and football club chairman, Tony Bloom is likewise a philanthropist. He founded the “Tony Bloom Charitable Trust”, now the “Bloom Foundation”, in 2011 which is an organization committed to fighting poverty and providing relief efforts for its effects in the UK, Europe and the developing nations of Africa and Asia. With his psychologist and Australian-born wife Linda Bloom and 3 other trustees, he co-founded the Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis Foundation.

By

Fun Facts You Might Not Know About UK Sports

uk cricketWithout a shadow of a doubt, the United Kingdom is home to one of the most ardent and passionate sports fans and athletes. It has given birth to legends throughout centuries and has its fair share of funny moments. Care to find out a few fun facts about UK sports? If you do, then read on. We’ve prepared loads for you.

·      The Olympics was held in London, the UK’s capital, back in 1908 and 1948. In 2012, it once again hosted the Summer Olympics. With that, London has become the very first city to have hosted the said sporting event thrice. During the same year, it was also the first time for every participating country to have at least one female athlete.

·      Despite being one of the biggest football nations in the world, UK’s national sport is actually cricket, an outdoor sport played by two teams of 11 players using a flat bat, a small hard ball, and wickets. A player scores by batting the ball and running, while the defenders can get a player out by bowling and hitting the wicket, catching a hit ball, or running the player out.

·      The northern wall of a tennis court in the Whitehall Palace, then the largest sporting complex in the entirety of Europe, is considered to be London’s oldest living sports structure. Built by Henry VIII in 1534, it can only be visited by government officials and cabinet ministers as of writing as it now forms part of the Cabinet Office, backing onto Downing Street.

·      Football has been repeatedly banned in the UK throughout history. The first was in April 13, 1314 after King Edward II received complaints from merchants about the noise in the city. It is to be noted that at the time there were no standards in place. Players can be as much as an entire town and public places like roads are often used. In many cases, the game ends violently. It was also seen as a distraction from practicing archery which was crucial in the nation’s defenses thus leading Edward III, Richard II, Edward IV and Henry IV to call for a ban in 1349, 1389, 1401 and 1477 respectively.

·      UK sports made a lot of history. The country has given birth to a range of major international sports such as association football, badminton, billiards, bowls, boxing, cricket, curling, darts, golf, hockey, ice hockey, modern rowing, netball, rugby (union and league), snooker, squash, table tennis and tennis.

By

5 Myths About Tony Bloom

Tony bloom lifeRenowned business magnate and chairman to the Brighton and Hove Albion F.C., Tony Bloom has become a household name over the years. In fact, we could consider him a celebrity by now. He’s earned it. But despite his success, not much is publicly known about his personal life.

That said people have come to create ideas about him. Let’s see the hits and misses as we list down and dissect the following myths about the man.

1st Myth: “He’s very meek.”

Unlike his predecessors such as Harry Dick Knight, Tony Bloom was a man of a few words. He would often give short speeches and was not one to appear in front of the cameras often. Because of this, many consider him to be meek and submissive. Contrary to this myth, Tony is quite the risk taker. In fact, his success and wealth began as he ventured into investments, something that requires a lot of gamble, leaving the corporate world in 1993. A man of a few words? Yes. But meek? Not so.

2nd Myth: “His idea of football is business.”

Because of his entrepreneurial and investment roots, many think that Tony got into the world of football for business reasons. But the truth of the matter is he did so because of sheer passion. Born as Anthony Grant Bloom in 1970, he grew up in a family of football aficionados. They were also massive fans of the Brighton and Hove Albion F.C. Growing up, Tony would attend matches at the Goldstone Ground with his father, uncle, brother and grandpa. Basically, he grew up loving it and entering the scene as investor first and eventually the club’s chairman was more of a childhood dream come true than a business move.

3rd Myth: “He inherited the chairmanship.”

Tony Bloom is the 3rd generation from his family to have been on board with the Brighton and Hove Albion F.C. with his grandpa Harry as vice-chair in the 70s and his uncle Ray as director in the 80s. It’s been 40 years with at least one of the Blooms in the club but he did not inherit any of it. After his successes with his various investment ventures, Tony decided to enter the scene by becoming one of the major stockholders back in 2000. But it wasn’t until May 2009 when he bought out and got majority share and finally became its latest and current chairman. Ever since, the Albions were in good hands. The American Express Community Stadium and American Express Elite Football Performance Centre were all his initiatives and were even partly backed from his own pocket.

By

Tony Bloom and His Advocacy Against Poverty

tony bloom charitableThe dictionary describes poverty as the state of not having enough money to take care of basic needs such as food, clothing, and housing. A great majority of the world’s population, 80% to be exact, lives on $10 or less a day. The disparity between the rich and the poor is widening more than ever with 40% of the population accounting only to 5% of global income while the rich enjoys a whopping 75%. What makes poverty a global catastrophe is that it catapults into various other social issues like hunger, sickness, lack of education and unemployment among others. This is what Tony Bloom and his foundation fights against.

Tony was born and grew up in the seaside resort town of Brighton in England to a well to-do family. He was sent to elite institutions and has worked in one of the country’s biggest names in accounting. Plus, he’s also the well-celebrated chairman of the Brighton and Hove Albion football club. Despite his upbringing and many successes, Tony has always had a hand when it comes to helping people and fighting poverty. Such was his fervency that in 2011 he spearheaded and founded the Tony Bloom Charitable Trust. Later on, it was then called the Bloom Foundation.

The charity’s main objective is to fight poverty and end it or at least relieve its effects not only in UK and the rest of Europe but also in the developing countries of Africa and Asia. Together with his fellow trustees Linda Bloom, Marc Sugarman, Adam Franks and Marcelle Lester, they offer and make grants to causes, projects and other organizations that serve the same objectives.

The Bloom Foundation’s charitable objects reads as follows, “the prevention or relief of poverty in developing countries by providing or assisting in the provision of education, training, healthcare projects and all the necessary support designed to enable individuals to generate a sustainable income and be self-sufficient. To promote and protect the physical and mental health of disabled and terminally ill children and soldiers disabled or made ill by conflict. Such charitable purposes for the public benefit as are exclusively charitable under the laws of England and Wales as the trustees may from time to time determine.”

The foundation generates income for its charitable undertakings through voluntary pledges and donations and investments and operates its offices in London. In 2015 alone, Tony Bloom and the foundation has generated £3.1 million worth of income, £1.9 million of which were spent on charitable activities, governance and investment management of the same period with the remainder retained for future projects and grants.

By

Fun Football Trivia to Ease a Boring Day

Are you bored and likewise a football aficionado? If so then you’ve come to the right place. We’re throwing out fun facts and trivia to turn those humdrum minutes to hours of knowledge and amusement!

  • Earlier versions of the game had no formal rules except that the objective was to get the ball to the goal. There was no limit as to the number of players and it was even played in roads and public areas. This often ended up in a mass riot. It wasn’t until 1848 that the rules on goal kicks, throw-ins and goalie’s rights were drafted in Cambridge signaling the need to standardize things.
  • It was banned in England to prepare people for war. In the 1300s, King Edward II forbade it in all of the country. Its immense popularity made him fear that people would opt to play rather than hone their skills in archery and battle in time for the war with Scotland.
  • Original balls weren’t made of rubber. They were inflated animal bladder, oftentimes that of a pig, and was used because of their durability and mass availability. They were eventually covered in leather for added fortification.
  • The ball isn’t a perfect sphere. It is in fact oval in shape and the illusion is all thanks to its impeccable design and pattern. A traditional football comes in black and white with thirty two panels that symbolize the countries in Europe, the continent where the sport’s initial craze started off.
  • If King Edward II was no lover of the sport, Queen Elizabeth II was the total opposite. She was said to love football so much that she would sneak out and disguise herself to watch and play matches near the Buckingham Palace as a teenager.
  • fifaDespite its reputation as one of the biggest football loving nations in the world, The United Kingdom’s national sport is in fact cricket. It is an outdoor sport played by two teams of 11 players using a flat bat, a small hard ball, and wickets. Scores are made by batting the ball and running, while the defenders can get a player out by bowling and hitting the wicket, catching a hit ball, or running the player out.
  • FIFA has 211 member nations. That’s a number fairly bigger than what the United Nations has with only 193 member countries.

By

Tony Bloom and His Continuous Fight Against Poverty

tony-bloom-charitable-trustTony Bloom, Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club’s esteemed chairman, does more than just build stadiums and training centers in the likes of the 30,750-seater American Express Community Stadium and the American Express Elite Football Performance Centre. He’s also a fervent philanthropist and actively fights poverty not only in the United Kingdom and the rest of Europe but also in the developing countries of Asia and Africa.

In 2011, he set up the “Tony Bloom Charitable Trust” which was later on renamed and recognized as “The Bloom Foundation” in a bid to find a systematic and organized means to relieve poverty and its effects and end it for good. The organization focuses on assigning and giving grants to causes, institutions and ventures that serve similar objectives: fighting poverty and its effects.

As per UNICEF’s records, nearly 22,000 children die each day due to hunger and poverty. More than three billion of the world’s entire population suffers from it, living off on less than £2.00 a day with others under extreme conditions of living on less than a £1.00 per day.

Among the many areas that the charity focuses, it has placed massive efforts in areas that concern health, education and training, livelihood and employment, food, water, safety, famine relief, overseas aide and community development among many others.

In fact, the Bloom Foundation’s charitable objects read that it aims to work on “the prevention or relief of poverty in developing countries by providing or assisting in the provision of education, training, healthcare projects and all the necessary support designed to enable individuals to generate a sustainable income and be self-sufficient. To promote and protect the physical and mental health of disabled and terminally ill children and soldiers disabled or made ill by conflict. Such charitable purposes for the public benefit as are exclusively charitable under the laws of England and Wales as the trustees may from time to time determine.”

With fellow trustees Linda Bloom, Marc Sugarman, Adam Franks and Marcelle Lester, Tony Bloom and his foundation runs its office in London. In March of 2015, it has reported voluntary pledges, donations and investments that totaled £3.1 million and £1.9 million worth of spending on charitable activities, governance and investment management. Of its total resources, 61% was allotted for charitable activities, 38% were retained for future grants and projects and 1% on governance and income generation activities.